In a time when the shifting political and cultural landscapes of our world are becoming increasingly authoritarian, restrictive, intolerant, and frightening, we have decided to dedicate The Charcoal Issue to fairy tales as forms of resistance and protest.

A remnant material left behind after a fire, charcoal is also a source with which new fires are created. So, too, is the way of resistance—born from the heat of difficulty and tragedy, but also the fuel we use to light the way forward.

For the coming issue, we are most interested in fairy tales that challenge the current political climate, fairy tales that resist outdated norms or binaries, fairy tales that reconfigure the faults of older stories, and fairy tales that expose abuses of power. Fairy tales with, as Kate Bernheimer has suggested, “radical strategies of survival. Ways to get out alive.”

Fairy tales that resist domination. Fairy tales that protest annihilation.

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Submissions for The Charcoal Issue be open from January 1, 2017 to March 31, 2017. The Charcoal Issue will be published in early 2018.

  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Simultaneous submissions are welcome; please note as such in your cover letter, and withdraw the submission immediately if accepted elsewhere. Withdrawals should be done through Submittable. If you submitted a packet of poems and must withdraw only one but would like the rest to remain under consideration, send us an email at ftreditorial@gmail.com.
  • Only one submission per genre during any reading period (except contests). For example: You may submit one piece of prose and one packet of poems, but not two pieces of prose. Additional submissions will be returned unread.
  • If you were published in the most recent issue, please wait until next year or submit only to our contest.

We hope to respond to submissions within 3 months.

Complete submission information, and all guidelines, can be found here.

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Between December 18, 2016 and January 15, 2017, we'll be taking applications for associate prose/poetry editors and readers in both genres.

We'll continue to accept both artwork and translation submissions year-round, in addition to submissions for Tiny Donkey.

Ends on March 31, 2017
This category is for any kind of prose, whether that be fiction, non-fiction, or a genre hybrid.

Please submit up to 8,000 words of a single prose piece for our consideration, or up to three flash pieces of prose each under 1,000 words. 

Manuscripts should be double-spaced, paginated, and in 12 pt. font unless the form of the piece dictates otherwise.

We consider fiction, nonfiction, and drama along with scholarly, illustrated, and hybrid works. If your piece is a prose/poetry hybrid, please submit to your preferred category—we like to let authors make that determination.
Ends on March 31, 2017
Submit up to five poems, totaling no more than 10 pages. Query about longer or unusual projects that fit outside these guidelines.

If your piece is a prose/poetry hybrid, please submit to your preferred category—we like to let authors make that determination.
Please submit up to 10 pieces of any original artwork, illustrated text, and graphic work (comics, black-line drawings, etc.) here. Artwork must be in high-resolution (300 dpi or higher) to be considered.

Artwork is considered for either print or online publication. If you have serious qualms with your work being in one of the two mediums, let us know in the cover letter, but print-only submissions will likely result in much longer response times.
As of mid-November 2015, we are accepting works of translation year-round. Works accepted will be published as soon as possible, depending on production schedules; for example, works accepted late in 2015 may not appear in print until the 2017 issue.

We are primarily interesting in works translated from any language into English, although we maintain a certain curiosity in works translated into Spanish as well.

Please provide proof of permission to translate and/or indicate public domain material. Submit up to 8,000 words of a single prose piece for our consideration, or up to linked three flash pieces of prose each under 1,000 words, or 3-5 poems totaling no more than 10 pages. For prose, manuscripts should be double-spaced, paginated, and in 12 pt. font unless the form of the piece dictates otherwise. For poetry, format can be dictated by the work in question.

Works that are not clearly stated as translations (either in the cover letter or in the body of the attached document), with the aforementioned permission/public domain indication, will be returned unread.

Query to ftreditorial@gmail.com about longer or unusual projects that fit outside these guidelines. 

Simultaneous submissions are fine provided you notify us as soon as possible if the work has been accepted elsewhere—withdraw the piece here on Submittable or, in the case of a packet with multiple pieces, send an email to ftreditorial@gmail.com stating which piece(s) have been accepted and should be withdrawn from consideration. Please see complete guidelines on our website for more information.

Tiny Donkey was created by Wren Awry during her time as an undergraduate editorial assistant with Fairy Tale ReviewWe see Tiny Donkey as a compliment to Fairy Tale Review, with similar goals but different means of accomplishing them. Tiny Donkey is not Fairy Tale Review's blog; rather, it is an independently-operated literary journal devoted to fairy tales in essay form. For the time being, Fairy Tale Review acts as a patron to help facilitate Tiny Donkey's growth.

For more information, visit http://tinydonkey.fairytalereview.com/about/.

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Tiny Donkey publishes short essays (up to 400 words in length) that explore fairy tales through scholarly, personal and cultural lenses. Tiny Donkey has a strong focus on original thought and dexterous, polished writing.

You can write Tiny Donkey essays from a lot of different angles (our first three posts include a piece that analyzes a film in relation to Bluebeard, one that ties in wolf re-introduction in New Mexico to wolf tropes in fairy tales, and a personal essay about hollow mountains, Jack Tales and the coal industry in Appalachia). You might come up with an entirely new idea, or turn a class paper in to a polished micro-essay. We’re open to challenging and unique form and content, just get in touch!